Mama Elephant Ink Pad Holder Tutorial

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   I wanted to share a tutorial that I’ve been asked to create. This is a great way to store ink pads in a smaller amount of space. I showed a photo on Instagram of an organizer I made out of foam core and put into a Recollections Organizer Cube – 3 Drawer that I purchased at Michaels.

Disclaimer: My measurements are based off the Recollections 3 drawer cube. Hobby Lobby also sells a 3 drawer cube, but I’m not sure of the measurements of the interior of the drawer. So, this may not work in that one.

   Okay, so you’ve seen the other ink pad holder tutorial. I have all the Mama Elephant inks and was frustrated when they wouldn’t fit in the first ink pad storage unit. So, I decided to make one that will fit the Mama Elephant inks. Because of the width of the ME ink pads, I could only fit 2 side by side. To fill in the empty space, I decided to design a way to hold my refills for the ME ink pads. This would be super easy to create a whole drawer of refill holders if you needed that.


   This organizer will hold 26 ink pads in a horizontal position with room to pull them out easily. It will also hold 18 ink refills in a horizontal position.

Let’s get started!

Supplies Needed:
Recollections Organizer Cube – 3 Drawer
Scrap piece of wood
  I recommend this instead of your cutting mat because you will be making a LOT of cuts and it could damage your mat.
30″x 20″x 3/16″ piece of foam core
Utility knife or Exacto knife (If you’re going to use an exacto knife, be sure to have some extra blades on hand.)
Lip Edged Ruler or T-Square (This is the one I used.)
Ruler or tape measure
Pencil


Instructions:
1. Lay your foam core on top of the scrap wood. With your piece of foam core landscape, measure and cut 1 width of 13 and 1 width of 10 1/8″.
Easiest way to do this is to measure out 13″ (10 1/8″ for the other) from left to right at both the top and the bottom. Then use your ruler to line up the marks.
For the piece left over, mark a 1 on it. You’re going to need it later.


2. Take your 13″ wide piece and lay it so the 13″ side is on the left. You’re going to make 3 pieces that are 2 1/4″ wide. Then you’re going to make 4 that are 1 3/4″ wide.
For the piece left over, mark a 2 on it. You’re going to need it later.
3. Grab your 10 1/8″ wide piece and lay it so the 10 1/8″ side is on the left. You’re going to make 8 pieces that are 2 1/4″ wide.
4. Grab the piece you marked with a 1. Cut this to 10 1/8″ wide. Then turn this piece so that the 10 1/8″ side is on the left and cut three 2 1/4″ pieces.
5. Grab the piece you marked with a 2. Cut a 2 1/4″ piece. Turn this so the 2 1/4″ side is on the left and measure and cut it down to 10 1/8″ wide.
From what’s left over, with the 13″ side on the left, cut the piece to 2 7/8″ wide.
Turn this piece so that the 2 7/8″ side is on the left. You’re going to cut 7 pieces 1 3/4″ wide.
6. Out of the scraps left over, cut another piece that is 2 7/8″ x 1 3/4″.
Now to figure up what you should have.
3 pieces that are 13″ x 2 1/4″
4 pieces that are 13″ x 1 3/4″
12 pieces that are 10 1/8″ x 2 1/4″
8 pieces that are 2 7/8″ x 1 3/4″


7. 3 pieces that are 13″ x 2 1/4″

   Grab 1 of these pieces. Turn it portrait and use a ruler and pencil to make a line down the center. This is where you’re going to cut up to.
    Now, turn it back landscape and you’re going to make a line at each measurement.
7/8″, 1 1/8″, 1 7/8″, 2 1/8″, 2 7/8″, 3 1/8″, 3 7/8″, 4 1/8″, 4 7/8″, 5 1/8″, 5 7/8″, 6 1/8″, 6 7/8″, 7 1/8″, 7 7/8″, 8 1/8″, 8 7/8″, 9 1/8″, 9 7/8″, 10 1/8″, 10 7/8″, 11 1/8″, 11 7/8″, 12 1/8″
Or you can do like in the graphic below *link will open in a new window (I found this easier with the lip edge ruler)


   For each of these pieces, you’re going to cut out the 1/4″ sections. Use a ruler to help with the cuts so they stay straight. When cutting the middle of the piece, it’s ok to have your blade go outside the lines, as long as you get that piece in a rectangle. You can see mine aren’t perfect. 🙂

You can see why I recommend using a board to cut on.


   Use the piece you measured out to trace the cut out sections of your jig on the remaining 2. This will save you a lot of measuring time.


   Now cut out the traced sections so it matches the one you’ve already cut.

8. 4 pieces that are 13″ x 1 3/4″

   Set one of these aside until you’re assembling.
   Grab one of the remaining 3 pieces. Turn it portrait and use a ruler and pencil to make a line down the center. This is where you’re going to cut up to.
   Now, turn it back landscape and you’re going to make a line at each measurement.
1 1/4″, 1 1/2″, 2 3/4″, 3″, 4 1/4″, 4 1/2″, 5 3/4″, 6″, 7 1/4″, 7 1/2″, 8 3/4″, 9″, 10 1/4″, 10 1/2″, 11 3/4″, 12″
Or you can do like in the graphic below *link will open in a new window(I found this easier with the lip edge ruler)


   For each 1/4″ section, you’re going to cut out. Use a ruler to help with the cuts so they stay straight. When cutting the middle of the piece, it’s ok to have your blade go outside the lines, as long as you get that piece in a rectangle.
   Use the piece you measured to trace the cut out sections on the remaining 2. This will save you a lot of measuring time.
   Now, cut out the traced sections so it matches the one you traced off.

9. 12 pieces that are 10 1/8″ x 2 1/4″

   Grab one of these pieces and turn it portrait. Use a ruler and pencil to make a line down the center. This is where you’re going to cut up to.
   Turn this piece back landscape and you’re going to make a line at each measurement.
3/16″, 4 15/16″, 5 3/16″, 9 15/16″
Or you can do like in the graphic below. *link will open in a new window (I found this easier with the lip edge ruler.)

Except that the parts marked 3/8″ (ends) are actually 3/16″.


   For the smaller sections on the end and in the middle, cut these out using a ruler to ensure a straight cut. When cutting the middle of the piece, it’s okay to have your blade go outside the lines, as long as you get that piece in the shape of a rectangle.
   Use this piece to trace the cut out sections on each of the 11 remaining pieces.
   Now, cut out the small sections on these pieces as well.

10. 8 pieces 2 7/8″ x 1 3/4″

   Grab one of these pieces and turn it portrait. Use a ruler and pencil to make a line down the center. This is where you’re going to cut up to.
   Turn this piece back landscape and you’re going to make a line at each measurement.
3/16″, 1 5/16″, 1 9/16″, 2 11/16″
Or you can do like in the graphic below.

Except that the parts marked 3/8″ (ends) are actually 3/16″.


   For the smaller sections on the end and in the middle, cut these out using a ruler to ensure a straight cut. When cutting the middle of the piece, it’s okay to have your blade go outside the lines, as long as you get that piece in the shape of a rectangle.
   Use this piece to trace the cut out sections on each of the 7 remaining pieces.
   Now, cut out the small sections on these pieces as well.

Assembly:
This can be tricky, but I found a few ways to make it easier on you. You can, by all means, assemble yours using adhesive. I chose not to because I’d like these to be removable in case my storage changes.
11. Grab the 3 pieces that are 13″ x 2 1/4″ and the 12 pieces that are 10 1/8″ x 2 1/4″. Start placing the slots together.


12. Take your drawer and place it standing up with the interior facing you and the handle to the left. Mine in the picture isn’t standing up. I realized this trick after building 3 of these.


13. Hold your pieces you fitted together upright. Make sure the cut out parts of the “shelf” pieces are facing forward (This means that if your drawer tips, the shelves won’t fall out.).
Slide your pieces into the drawer while it’s standing up. The vertical piece is going to be a very tight fit.

The image shown is the other ink holder. I’m using it as a reference so you know which way your cut out parts should be facing.


14. Take your remaining 2 vertical pieces and line up the openings (one end has a wider space) with the cut out pieces of the shelves. You will have to wiggle the shelves a little, but it WILL work. I have now made 5 of these. This is the hardest part, but totally worth it in the end. *This may be easier to accomplish with the drawer laying flat.
*Make sure this is pushed all the way to the left or right of your drawer. It will increase stability and give you room for the next part.

15. Grab 3 of the pieces that are 13″ x 1 3/4″ (Make sure to keep the 4th one in sight!) and the 8 pieces that are 2 7/8″ x 1 3/4″. Start placing the slots together.
16. Make sure your drawer is in the upright position again and hold your fitted pieces upright, making sure the cut out sections of the “shelf” pieces are facing forward.
Slide your pieces into the drawer while it’s standing up. The vertical piece is going to be a tight fit.
17. Take your remaining 2 vertical pieces and line up the openings (one end has a wider space) with the cut out pieces of the shelves. You will have to wiggle the shelves a little, but it WILL work. *This may be easier to accomplish with the drawer laying flat.
*Make sure this is pushed all the way to the opposite side of your drawer.
18. Grab that last piece that is 13″ x 1 3/4″. This is going to take some finagling. I actually had to use a bone folder to help me insert it. You should have about a 3/16″ gap between the two shelf units. Slide this piece in as a shim to increase stability.
This is what your unit should look like when completed.


19.Turn your 3 drawer cube on its side and slide in your drawer.


Be sure to comment below if you recreate one. I love hearing that someone liked something I created. Also, be sure to link back so that others can find this!

Yay, a comment!

  1. Reegan shares:

    Boy that relaly helps me the heck out.



Send me some encouragement!